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Thursday, April 17, 2014
Twelve Lynbrook High School students submitted research papers to the 2013 Intel Science Talent Search. Front row from left were Stephanie Mertz, Zoe Daniels, Olivia Mooney, Dana Fader and Olivia Watman. Back row from left were Brandon Wong, Edward Tischler, Jordan Goldsamt, Rose Paskoff, Tess Lewin-Jacus, Maxwell Brown and Nicolai Tayco.
School news
12 Lynbrook HS students submit Intel papers

After months of painstaking research, 12 seniors in the Lynbrook High School Science Research program have submitted research project reports to the Intel Science Talent Search, the nation’s most prestigious science research competition for high school seniors. Semifinalists will be announced on Jan. 9.

For the past 13 years, seven semifinalists from Lynbrook High School have been named. This year’s contenders — Maxwell Brown, Zoe Daniels, Dana Fader, Jordan Goldsamt, Tess Lewin-Jacus, Stephanie Mertz, Olivia Mooney, Rose Paskoff, Nicolai Tayco, Edward Tischler, Olivia Watman and Brandon Wong — all hope to be among the next to join this select group of semifinalists who will compete for $1.25 million in awards as they bring honor to their school.

These dedicated young scientists worked for countless hours on independent science research projects in their high school science lab and in famed research facilities such as Weill Cornell Medical Center, Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory and NYU Hospital for Joint Diseases. Delving into the fields of aeronautics, environmental engineering, biomedical research and social sciences, a number of students worked side by side with mentors who are conducting similar research in their own professional labs. Under the guidance of science research teacher David Shanker, all of these students spent their junior year developing background information, reviewing literature, reading professional journal articles and contacting potential mentors to develop summer internships.

“By competing in the Intel, students learn how to conduct research on a professional level,” said Shanker. “They also make important professional connections that will help them as they go on to earn advanced degrees, whether they choose to pursue research careers or follow some other path of study.”

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